Welcome to the Homeowner’s Newsletter/Blog!  You’ll find plenty of useful information for keeping your house in great condition so that you can enjoy it for years to come. Preserve your investment—and keep your family safe and healthy—by maintaining your home using the following tips.

Radon

Radon is a cancer-causing, radioactive gas. You cannot see, smell or taste radon. But it still may be a problem in your home. Although radon is a naturally occurring gas in our environment, it is also the second leading cause of lung cancer deaths in the U.S., according to the U.S. Surgeon General. Nearly one out of every 15 homes is estimated to have elevated radon levels. The Surgeon General and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recommend testing all houses. Millions of Americans have already tested their homes for radon, and you should, too.  (And if you smoke and your home has high radon levels, your risk of lung cancer is especially high.)

Let your Eagle Engineering inspector test your home for radon.
You cannot predict radon levels based on state, local or neighborhood radon measurements. Do not rely on radon test results from other homes in the neighborhood to estimate the radon level in your own homeHomes that are next to each other can have different radon levels. Testing is the only way to find out what your home‘s radon level is.  Your local Eagle Engineering inspector uses special interference-proof air-canister testing devices that will measure the radon levels in different areas of the home over a limited period of time, which will help determine whether installing a mitigation system is recommended.  A radon mitigation system can aid in continuously and automatically filtering outdoor ground air that enters the home, which will help reduce your home’s radon level.

Radon in Water
If the results of your radon air sampling test show elevated levels and your water comes from a private well, have your inspector test your water, too. The devices and procedures for testing for radon in your home‘s water supply are different from those used for measuring radon in indoor air. If your water tests positive for radon, this can add to your risk of exposure because the radon can be released into the air during showering and while performing household tasks using water.

The EPA estimates that radon causes thousands of cancer deaths in the U.S. each year. Testing is the only way to determine your home‘s radon levels. Contact your local Eagle Engineering inspector to conduct your radon inspection at (865) 250-8983.

Source:  InterNACHI newsletter Issue 5 August 2019

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